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What Linux Should I Use?

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#1 KingEvil

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 12:51 AM

Hi..


They are 5 different versions from linux.. what should i use?? :unsure:

#2 ceder

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 01:22 AM

Only 5?
Here is a test to help you to choose a distribution.
http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/

#3 KingEvil

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 05:30 AM

Only 5?
Here is a test to help you to choose a distribution.
http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/



aaa...! thx! :D

#4 cduke250

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 12:44 AM

In my humble opinion, ArchLinux is far and above the best linux distro out there.

ARCH LINUX ROCKS!

I have tried probably 90% of every flavor of linux in the past 5 years, and arch-linux beats every other distro hands-down every time..

The only time arch loses over another distro is in terms of complex configurations. The only times I don't use arch is when I need an extremely complex system, then I use BSDs.. but for complex linux systems, I go gentoo or Slackware.

Its the fastest, easiest, coolest linux distro I've ever used.


Reasons:
Want to install nmap? Nessus? hping? ethereal?
Go to a root prompt and type
pacman -S nmap nessus hping ethereal

Want to search for a package?
pacman -Ss vconfig 

current/vconfig 1.9-1
	 VLAN configuration utility

Gentoo is my 2nd favorite, though I don't use it anymore (I use FreeBSD instead of linux for most everything these days)

I hope you do try archlinux.. If you don't you will be missing out on a tight little distro. I have tried out over 30 linux distros in the past 5 years, even writing a paper on GSO about
how to install multiple operating systems on 1 hard-drive, using grub, and installing all of these distros WITHOUT a CD-ROM drive or burner.. just the ISO.

To do the research for that paper, I basically had to download every distro I could get my hands on and check out the BOOT codes and the different managers.. Anyway, So I have an unusual amount of experience with a lot of distros.

It is definately worth your guys time to go check out archlinux.. If I'm BS'ing you then come back and call me out.. Enjoy!



First, let me say I have tried every mentioned Distro, including all BSD, debian, and nixes.

My favorite linux distros (this thread is specific to linux) are:

1. Slackware

2. Arch-linux

3. Gentoo


The best distro is arch-linux, for superusers and moderate-newbies.

The number one reason I like it is because of pacman. You can really feel in control of archlinux from the very beginning. It installs a minimal number of packages and from then on you can add packages to your system whenever you want. pacman trumps any package manager ive ever used (for this purpose)

So you can have a minimal install with network programs and XFCE and it is a lot faster than anything else. And its easier to administrate and navigate.

How to start:

[within the initial setup after arch cd is booted]
1. Download the archlinux iso from www.archlinux.org and burn to cd.
2. Boot and the install is super easy. Only install the base group to begin.
3. use ext2 for /boot, reiserfs for /. Install the kernel from source for allaround better system and easier installs later.
4. Install grub and edit the grub file -- change the time from 5 to 555 or whatever.

5. edit rc.conf- disable netfs, and add a hostname and setup your eth0= and gateway.. add any specific modules like 8139too or 8021q or 3c59x to rc.conf modules section.
to spoof the mac at startup, use this form
eth1="eth1 172.16.0.126 netmask 255.255.254.0 broadcast 255.255.255.255 hw ether 00:05:55:65:95:5c"
the only important part is the hw ether part.

6. edit your resolv.conf and add your nameservers.
7. reboot and log in as root ... follow these commands.
# passwd
type in new root passwd.
# adduser
add a new user
# exit
now log in as new user
# su -
log in as root
# gpasswd -a usernameyoucreated wheel
# gpasswd -a username slocate

# touch /var/lib/slocate/slocate.db
# cd /
# updatedb&

8. Get X working, as usernameyoucreated
# mount /mnt/cd
if it doesn't mount, do a 'cat /etc/fstab' and see whats up
# cd /mnt/cd/arch/pkg
# su -
# pacman -A xfce(hit tab here)
# pacman -A wget(hit tab)

install whatever packages you want but you basically just want X to work.

# pacman -Ss |less
displays all programs you can install with description.

Now as root do
# xorgcfg
then
# vim /etc/X11/xorg.conf
Sample section with wheel support
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "PS/2 Mouse"
Driver "mouse"
Option "Protocol" "IMPS/2"
Option "Device" "/dev/psaux"
Option "ZAxisMapping" "4 5"
EndSection

sample section
SubSection "Display"
Depth 16
Modes "1280x1024" "1024x768" "1152x864" "800x600"
EndSubSection

whatever mode is listed first is the one that will be open. So change to 800x600 first is you want.



9. Now get your network working if its not already configured in /etc/rc.conf
as root
# ifconfig -a
if nothing shows up, do modprobe 8139too, 3c59x, tulip and try agian. if it works add to your modules section in rc.conf
# ifconfig eth0 netmask 255.255.254.0 broadcast 192.168.1.255 192.168.1.128
input your net settings. You can use dhcp by setting it in /etc/rc.conf
# ifconfig eth0 up
# route -nv add default gw 192.168.1.1 dev eth0
# cat /etc/resolv.conf (to make sure your nameservers are correct)
# vim /etc/hosts (to make sure your hosts are correct)
now ping yourself, then ping your gateway, then ping your nameservers to make sure everything works.


10. Here is where archlinux is BOSS linux distro.. check it out. (BTW, adding the cd as a server is optional, it is a good security precaution becuase you can set up your system before connecting to the net. This method works and is mostly for unconnected machines. or slow bandwidth machines.)
reboot and make sure your network is working.
now vim /etc/pacman.conf as root and add this Server lines. Also, if you already installed wget as instructed above, uncomment the line
XferCommand = /usr/bin/wget --passive-ftp -c -O %o %u


[current]
# Add your preferred servers here, they will be used first
Server = file:///mnt/cd/arch/pkg
Include = /etc/pacman.d/current

[extra]
# Add your preferred servers here, they will be used first
Server = file:///mnt/cd/arch/pkg
Include = /etc/pacman.d/extra


Now do a pacman -Syu and if it works go ahead. If it says no db file, do this
1. vim /etc/updatedb.conf and remove the iso9660 so that slocate will search CDs
2. cd / and as root do updatedb&
3. after jobs is done, do a slocate extra.db.tar.gz or whatever.
4. copy the file where you need it.
If it cant find the db, do a tar -zcvf /whereyouwantthedb /mnt/cd/arch/lib/whatever

If you are connected to the net or don't want to install from CDs, remove the Server lines from the pacman.conf file and do this
# pacman -Syu
this will update your files database and upgrade your current packages
# pacman -S packagename
installs a package and all dependencies.
packages to install
ethereal hdparm ipfm lsof netcat openssh traceroute whois dia etherape figlet hexcurse hexedit host htmldoc iptraf lft mtr hping2 nessus-plugins nessus-libraries nmap fam chkrootkit gnupg gnupg2 gimp ghostscript gvim hal hwd j2re libcap links mozilla-firefox nessus-core netkit-telnet netselect ntfsprogs openssl parted perl portmap progsreiserfs qtparted python ruby rxvt slocate rdesktop rar ssldump tcpdump ttf-cheapskate ttf-ms-fonts vconfig zip

You can see a full list with description at www.archlinux.org

Every so often run pacman -Syu to upgrade and check all your packages.

if you cant get X to work keep making small changes then run startx and then read /var/log/Xorg.log

To see your devices, hwd is the best. Otherwise use lspci -vv

For window managers I use kde for pleasure, blackbox for server utils like nessus, and xfce for misc.

If you cant use X then browse the web with links, or lynx.

if you need to change permissions here is a good way to do it.
Say you need to change all files in your home directory /home/user becuase somehow root touched them. Username is leet: as root
# chown -c -R leet:users /home/leet
This shows you every change and is recursive. I add this to my .bashrc file
alias chmyd='cd /home ; chown -c -R leet:users /home/leet ; chown -c -R webbed:users /home/webbed'

uncomment this in /etc/inputrc to get rid of the beep
set bell-style none


=========================
Those are the main issues I have when installing and setting up arch. There is a ton of specific and updated help on the archlinux.org's wiki page.

More in the thread Choosing your linux distro and here
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#5 funtu$h

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 12:18 PM

For begining ubentu is good

#6 Guest_Dennis_*

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 01:11 PM

If you really want to get serious, get your hands dirty and have alot of patience, go with Gentoo. Stage 1 if you feel like it :)

p.s there are millions of different distro's out there. to get a nice resemblance, goto http://polishlinux.org

#7 KingEvil

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Posted 01 February 2007 - 02:50 PM

If you really want to get serious, get your hands dirty and have alot of patience, go with Gentoo. Stage 1 if you feel like it :)

p.s there are millions of different distro's out there. to get a nice resemblance, goto http://polishlinux.org



ok! thanks to all

#8 KalciumKid

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 03:04 AM

Ubuntu 6.10
Tons of support, looks the best (My Opinion) And I think is the most widely used.

#9 rlastinger

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 09:30 AM

Ubuntu 6.10
Tons of support, looks the best (My Opinion) And I think is the most widely used.


Tough question. Debian, Gentoo, Slackware, Yellow Dog, CentOS, Whitebox, ubuntu... all good ones. Then there are the BSD's and openSolaris, but I don't know about marketability on a resume is in the question here. If you're looking for something to put on a resume, then SuSe, Fedora Core's, Whitebox, Open Solaris... those might be the closest to being marketable. If you just want to play. Um... I think most of them are good. I will go with... slackware this time.

Never used Arch Linux. I'll have to build an arch linux vm and try that one. Good support on packages?

#10 cduke250

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 12:41 PM

Never used Arch Linux. I'll have to build an arch linux vm and try that one. Good support on packages?



Arch Linux is by far my favorite distro.. and I know what the heck I'm talking about! :) Their is GREAT support for arch linux, I especially like the phpbb board.
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#11 cduke250

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Posted 13 March 2007 - 09:21 PM


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#12 Ryan M

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Posted 15 March 2007 - 06:52 AM

For anyone new to linux I would highly reccomend:Ubuntu
hxxp://www.ubuntu.com/

Also, please refer to the search function of the forum, there are a lot of posts and there is a ton of information pertaining to this exact question.

For reference:http://www.governmentsecurity.org/forum/index.php?showtopic=14832
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#13 Kenny

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Posted 16 March 2007 - 11:33 AM

i installed ubuntu on my laptop last year... also KDE to give me 2 options Ubuntu or Kubuntu on login screen...never had an issue with them

previous used knoppix full install as Debian.. also Slackware , Auditor and several years back even Turbo Linux to name but a few...

must admit prefer Kubuntu ..then again i like things that runs smooth ;)
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#14 Xander

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 12:45 AM

OpenBSD. Not for the weak minded who give up quickly. And its certainly not like Ubuntu, where you install and immediatly have a working GUI and all the nice little programs installed.

But its so good when its up and running perfect ;)

#15 Guest_Dennis_*

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Posted 17 March 2007 - 01:03 AM

If you want to go for something that is not for the weak minded, go for gentoo stage1 tarball ;)





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